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BWNC Maple syrup program

BWNC Maple syrup program

Baltimore Woods Nature Center is located at 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus, NY 13108
Hours: Interpretive Center is open M-F 9am-4pm, Saturday 10am-4pm, closed Sundays.
The hiking trails and parking are free and open every day from dawn to dusk.
Visit www.baltimorewoods.org for more information

FEBRUARY 2011 CALENDAR OF EVENTS
Project FeederWatch (more…)

Posted: Thursday, January 6th, 2011 @ 2:18 pm by Curt
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Fun Fact about the Syracuse area …. did you know …..

… in December of 1892, the pneumatic automobile tire was patented in Syracuse, NY by Alexander Brown & George Stillman. Before the pneumatic tire, wheels were often made of solid rubber. This made travel a bumpy experience since streets in 1892 were made of dirt, brick, planks or cobblestone. Some horse-drawn carriages had been made with inflatable tires, but Brown and Stillman received the first patent for pneumatic automobile tires. Brown was the co-founder of Brown-Lipe-Chapin Company, a firm that was absorbed by General Motors. His former home (located at 726 W. Onondaga St.) is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Attached, please find this week’s edition of the Friday Facts. For details on any of these events or others down the road, take a gander at our website at www.VisitSyracuse.org.

Look-it … it’s right here at www.VisitSyracuse.org!

Linda Woodrow Executive Assistant & Marketing Coordinator Syracuse Convention & Visitors Bureau CenterState Corporation for Economic Opportunity 572 South Salina St., Syracuse, NY 13202 Phone: 315-470-1913 | Fax: 315-471-8545 LWoodrow@VisitSyracuse.org www.VisitSyracuse.org   Facebook:  www.Facebook.com/SyracuseNY Twitter:  www.Twitter.com/SyracuseNY

Posted: Friday, December 24th, 2010 @ 10:24 am by Curt
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The Best Small Cities to Raise a Family

http://www.forbes.com/2010/10/25/small-cities-family-lifestyle-real-estate-quality-of-life.html

“Auburn, N.Y., a tiny Finger Lakes, takes the top spot for the Northeast region, and comes in at No. 18 in the nation.”

Big, bustling cities are magnets for adventure-seekers and ambitious young people. But the grit and flashiness that attract singles to New York, Los Angeles and Miami aren’t necessarily what parents look for in a place to settle down. Young people looking to start a family might do well to look past the bright lights of the big city.

Instead, maybe consider a place like Dubuque, Iowa, Manitowoc, Wis., or Marquette, Mich. These places boast solid average incomes, good educational prospects, low costs, short commute times and high rates of home ownership–all reasons why they rank as the top three small cities in America to raise a family.

So what is so special about these places? Our top-ranked city, Dubuque, Iowa, is much smaller than a place like New York, with a population of 92,139, but still one of the larger cities on our list (we only ranked cities with a population under 100,000). Dubuque’s size puts it in a kind of sweet spot: large enough to be a center of industry, small enough to not be overcrowded.

An economy that successfully diversified after the collapse of the local manufacturing industry contributes to an unemployment rate that’s nearly half the national average, at 6.5%, and a median household income of $48,779. That means most families have the jobs they need. They also don’t have to spend a lot of time getting there: Only 2.6% of the population spends an hour or more getting to work.

Our top three cities are all in the Midwest, and the region is home to 12 of the top 15 cities. It would seem that mountains, big skies and open plains lend themselves to family life. But while the small towns in Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin, Iowa, North Dakota and Illinois dominate the list, there are small cities that shine in every region of the country. The rugged mountain town of Casper, WY, is the highest-ranked family-friendly small city in the West, and ranked eighth overall in the nation. The city does particularly well providing residents with affordable housing–families there spend only 17% of their income on housing costs.

Auburn, N.Y., a tiny Finger Lakes town probably best known for its correctional facility, takes the top spot for the Northeast region, and comes in at No. 18 in the nation. Prison jobs boost the local income, which ranks 20th among small cities at $48,991.

The best Southern small city for families? Tiny Frankfort, Ky., with a population of only 69,659. It ranks No. 20 on our nationwide list. Frankfort may be small, but the few families there are well off: The median household income is $50,671.

To pinpoint the best small places to raise a family, we looked at quality-of-life measures that make living easier for families. We started with the most recent data available from the U.S. Census Bureau on all Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas with a population under 100,000. That left us with 126 cities, which we ranked on five measures.

Short commute times improve family life because they give working parents more time at home with their kids, so we scored cities on the percentage of residents that spent an hour or more getting to work in the morning: the lower the better. Since educational outcomes are a key consideration of families looking to relocate, we ranked cities on the percentage of adults aged 25 and older that had at least a high school degree.

We also scored cities on median household income, the rate of home ownership, and housing affordability, for which we used median housing costs as a percentage of income as a proxy. We averaged the rankings across these measures to arrive at final scores. When cities were tied in rank, we used the rate of homeownership to break the tie.

The choice of where to settle down and bring up youngsters is based on a number of complex and personal factors, many of which can’t be measured in a ranked list. But things like affordability, education and jobs are often among them–and these off-the-radar metros have a great deal to offer.

Posted: Thursday, December 2nd, 2010 @ 9:08 am by Curt
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Press Release: For Immediate Release
11.03.10
Contact: Thea Reidy 315 247-7904 (cell); 314 673-1350 (office)
info@baltimorewoods.org

Baltimore Woods Nature Center is located at 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus, NY 13108
Hours: Interpretive Center is open M-F 9am-4pm, Saturday 10am-4pm, closed Sundays.
The hiking trails and parking are free and open every day from dawn to dusk.
Visit www.baltimorewoods.org for more information

December Calendar of Events:

Saturday 4th Saturday Fly-Ties 11am-Noon

As fishing season wraps up, Baltimore Woods invites you to bring your tools and materials for fly-tying. We’ll learn and share fly tying techniques while enjoying coffee and camaraderie. Please register. Donations appreciated.

Saturday 4th Project FeederWatch Kick-Off 2pm-3pm

Join us for the official start of our Project FeederWatch program. Naturalists will lead a talk about birds in winter and discuss how you can attract more birds to your own yard. We’ll learn to identify some of these hardy wintertime visitors and collect important information to help scientist study these amazing creatures. Members $5, $15/family; nonmembers $8, $25/family.

Monday 6th Home School Expeditions 10am

No Scheduled Program, however, The Woods will be open. We encourage you to come out for a family snowshoe adventure. The nonmember rental fee is $5 per person; Members borrow snowshoes free of charge.

Friday 10th Project FeederWatch 10am-3pm

Stop by the Interpretive Center to participate in Project FeederWatch. Baltimore Woods is partnering with Cornell Lab of Ornithology to collect important data about birds. Become a citizen scientist spending a few moments recording what birds are visiting our feeders, and contribute to bird conservation efforts. Donations appreciated.

Saturday 11th Caroling in the Woods 7pm-8:30pm

Pick up a lantern and song sheet and enjoy a beloved tradition at Baltimore Woods. Bring natural treats to hang for the birds and holiday treats to share with fellow carolers. Finish up the night with hot drinks in the Interpretive Center where a special guest may stop by to visit! This event is free for both members and nonmembers if you bring cookies to share.

Tuesday 14th Keep it Natural, “Not a Creature Was Stirring….” 10:30am

This time of year, many critters are nestled in their beds for the winter waiting out the winter. We’ll discuss the wintering habits of several animals found in Central New York while we enjoy warming refreshments. Members $5; nonmembers $8.

Friday 17th Project FeederWatch 10am-3pm

See description on December 10th.

Saturday 18th Project FeederWatch 10am-3pm

See description on December 10th.

Saturday 18th Frost Moon Snowshoe Hike 7pm-8:30pm

Spend a magical evening outdoors under the year’s last full moon. Take a moonlit walk with a Baltimore Woods naturalist. Along the way, enjoy the peaceful beauty of the season and pause to appreciate the solitude this time of year brings. Snowshoes included in the price of registration, children’s sizes available for ages 4 and up. Come for a moonlit hike if there’s no snow. Accommodates 12-25; registration required. Members $5, family $15; nonmembers $8, family $25.

Monday 20th Nature’s Little Explorers 10am-11am

Children and parents —join us for fun and discovery as we learn about the natural world around us. These guided explorations follow Growing Up Wild curriculum designed for children ages 3-5. Children must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. Registration required, accommodates 5-20 preschoolers. Members $8/preschooler; nonmembers $12.

Night Tree Join Baltimore Woods as we read Night Tree by Eve Bunting. After, we will create festive treats for our wildlife friends and use them to decorate our own winter tree here at Baltimore Woods.

Friday 24th and Saturday 25th

Interpretive Center Closed for Christmas

While the Interpretive Center is closed, use of the trails and parking are free and open dawn to dusk. The Interpretive Center reopens Monday, December 27th. Happy Holidays!

Wednesday 29th Christmas Bird Count 9am-Noon

Please join us for our annual Christmas Bird Count, a tradition started in the United States by Audubon ornithologist Frank Chapman over a hundred years ago. Spend time counting birds at our feeder viewing area or join naturalists afield to look for birds in the woods. The data collected here at Baltimore Woods is be added to our bird archives and helps us to see bird population trends. Registration required. Donations appreciated.

Friday 31st

Interpretive Center Closed

It’s ben nother great year of “Nature in Your Hands” The Interpretive Center will be closed today, but please take advantage of our free parking and hiking trails that are open dawn to dusk.

Baltimore Woods Nature Center
4007 Bishop Hill Road, P.O. Box 133
Marcellus, NY 13108
315 673-1350 office 315 247-7904 cell
www.baltimorewoods.org
Nature in your hands

Posted: Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010 @ 9:01 pm by Curt
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Fun Fact about Syracuse & Onondaga County …. did you know …..

… the hamlet of Cardiff, which lies within the town of LaFayette, is the home to one of the biggest hoaxes in American History – the Cardiff Giant. George Hull, an atheist, hired a sculptor in Chicago and had the finished “giant” shipped by rail to the farm of William Newell where it was buried. About a year later (October 16, 1869), he had workers dig a well on the site and they found the giant. Hull set up a tent and charged 25 cents per person to see it. The premise was that this was evidence of a giant race of peoples that were mentioned in the Bible, Genesis 6:4. Eventually the exhibit was sold and moved to Syracuse where P.T. Barnum offered the new owner $50,000. When Barnum was turned down, he had a plaster replica made, noting that his was the original. In 1870, after much litigation, both were declared fakes. The original piece can be seen today at the Farmers Museum in Cooperstown.

Attached, please find this week’s edition of the Friday Facts. For details on any of these events or others down the road, take a gander at our website at www.VisitSyracuse.org.

Check out our FINE ON-LINE STORE (http://store.visitsyracuse.org/home.php?cat=249) featuring great Syracuse items such as T’s, hoodies, fleece items, tote bag & more! If you’re looking for Syracuse items, we got ‘em right on the website (items available for purchase on-line only). Check it out TODAY!!!

Look-it … it’s right here at www.VisitSyracuse.org!

Posted: Thursday, October 7th, 2010 @ 11:45 am by Curt
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